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Wakonda: 4th Grade - Nebraska History

Libguide for the Wakonda Library

4th Grade Project Requirements

Students will present their historical information about Nebraska Frontier in pictures, posters, oral/written narratives, or electronic information.

  • Students will draft their research, including facts, definitions, and details, into a final project
  • Project options include (but are not limited to): poster, brochure, written report, informational book, diorama with written piece, PowerPoint, Sway, poetry, journal entries, cartoon, timeline, map, cause and effect chain/poster, newspaper article, interview, or others at teacher discretion or student choice
  • All projects should include connections to reading, writing, and speaking

vids

Nebraska History Topics

 

Oregon Trail

Native Americans

 

Fur Trade,

Keelboat,

 

Oregon Trail,

Pioneers,

Prairie,

 

Sacagawea,

 

Wagon Train,

 

William Clark,

Thomas Jefferson,

Meriwether Lewis,

Lewis and Clark Expedition,

 

Citations

Woolley, Katie. ____________________________________. Windmill Books, 2017.

Olien, ____C_________. The Changing Earth. Bridgestone Books, 2003.

_____Co__________, M. Sacagawea: Indian Guide. Magic Wagon, 2009.

 

 

“_Sac_______________.” Ducksters Educational Site, Technological Solutions, Inc.,

 

www.ducksters.com/biography/explorers/sacagawea.php.

"Sacagawea." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, _____date_______. school.eb.com/levels/elementary/article/Sacagawea/353736. Accessed 5 Feb. 2019.

 

 

Brittanica

Sacagawea was born in about 1786 in what is now Idaho or Montana. When Sacagawea was about 10 or 12 years old, a group of Hidatsa Native Americans captured her. They took her to what is now North Dakota. In about 1804 Sacagawea became the wife of a French Canadian trapper named Toussaint Charbonneau.

 

 

 

 

Sacagawea was born in about 1786 in what is now Idaho or Montana. When Sacagawea was about 10 or 12 years old, a group of Hidatsa Native Americans captured her. They took her to what is now North Dakota. In about 1804 Sacagawea became the wife of a French Canadian trapper named Toussaint Charbonneau.

In 1803 President Thomas Jefferson organized an expedition to explore the territory between the Missouri River and the Pacific Ocean. Meriwether Lewis and William Clark headed the expedition. They arrived near what is now Bismarck, North Dakota, in the fall of 1804. They spent the winter among the Mandan tribe of Native Americans.

During this time Lewis and Clark hired Charbonneau as a guide. Sacagawea joined the expedition as well. On February 11, 1805, Sacagawea gave birth to a baby boy, Jean-Baptiste. When the expedition set out on April 7, Sacagawea carried her infant son on her back.

Sacagawea identified plants for the explorers. She also searched for fruits and vegetables that they could eat. In addition, her presence showed other Native Americans that the group came in peace. Many tribes believed that a woman with an infant would travel only with a peaceful group.

In August 1805 the expedition met some Shoshone in what is now Montana. The chief of these Shoshone was Sacagawea’s brother, Cameahwait. He gave the expedition horses and guides to help them on their journey.

 

Charbonneau and Sacagawea went all the way to the Pacific coast with the expedition. Sacagawea may have died several years after the return journey, in 1812. But some stories say that she rejoined the Shoshone in Wyoming and lived until 1884.

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